Van Gundy Family Tree


Notes for Andrew VAN GUNDY


The History of Vermilion Co, IL says:

CHAPTER XXI.
SOME ELDER SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF VERMILION COUNTY.

"JAMES O'NEAL CLAIMS TO BE FIRST WHITE CHILD OF WHITE CHILDREN MRS.
ELIZABETH ( MCDONALD) HARMON, ONE OF THE FIRST WHITE CHILDREN BORN IN VERMILION COUNTY JAMES O'NEAL, BORN IN l822 MARY (COX) PATTERSON, BORN IN 1823 WILLIAM P. SWANK, BORN IN 1824 PERRY O'NEAL, BORN IN 1825 JAMES H. STEVENS, BORN IN 1826 D. B. DOUGLASS AND RHODA M. HESTER, BORN IN 1827ABNER SNOW, S. P. LCNEVE AND ANDREW GUNDY, BORN IN 1828 Vermilion Co..."

He was mentioned in :

PROCEEDINGS OP THE REGISTER OF THE OLD SETTLERS AT CATLIN, ILL. SEPTEMBER .'6, 1885.

Andrew Gundy... 56---(born) Bismark, 111 1829. . (residence)

He was also mentioned in the diary of Uncle Thomas Gundy as spending the night at Milton Lee's house on 1/14/1887.

The History of Vermilion Co, IL recorded his bio:

"The Gundy family is one which has been prominent in the affairs of Vermilion County since when, in 1822, Joseph and Sally Gundy, his wife, came to Ross township and settled. He came from Indiana, being a native of Pennsylvania or Ohio. Mr. Joseph Gundy was a useful and enterprising man and a pioneer such as make for the advancement of any section in which he may choose a home. He died in 1846 and was buried in the Gundy burying ground near Myersville. Andrew Gundy was born on the Gundy place near Myersville, November 20, 1828, the son of Joseph and Sally (Davidson) Gundy. The first school Andy Gundy attended was one taught by George Stipp in a vacant house on the Luke Wiles place, just west of the North Fork at Myersville. He continued his studies in the schools of that section, going to Georgetown for his higher branches. He was busy on the farm during his youth, but when he was twenty-three years old he went into business for himself as a merchant in Myersville. He at the same time carried on an extensive trade in wool, grain and stock. He was a man of affairs and held many offices of trust and responsibility. He had a large private interest in coal
lands, and when he was sent to the state legislature, was chosen as a member of the committee on mines and mining. He also served on two other committees, one of which was the finance committee. This was in the twenty-ninth general assembly. He was repeatedly elected as supervisor from Newell township, and he accumulated much property and his influence was extensive. He was identified with many important ventures of the county, one of which was the banking and other interests of John C. Short, in which he lost a large amount of property. Mr. Gundy was never married."

Another history had the following:

"Andrew was a large and successful farmer and engaged in mercantile pursuits, was largely interested in public affairs, was a member of the legislature in 1875 (the 29th general assembly) and proved by his long acquaintance with the wants of the people and the breadth of his general intelligence a useful and safe legislator. After the failure of Hon. John C. Short, Mr. Gundy and some others undertook to stand in the breach and save the important coal interest which Mr. Short held, but the continued depression of trade and the large shrinkage of values was more than they could stand, and financial failure followed. There was little reason to doubt that the immense coal fields controlled and owned by the Exchange bank, would eventually pay all the debts of that concern, but the depression of the coal trade so reduced the profit that they ceased to be a source of revenue. Mr. Gundy is now engaged in farming near Bismark."
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