Van Gundy Family Tree


Notes for George William COONROD


Residences & events:

From History of Greene & Jersey Counties, Illinois:

"The next to fill this position (of sheriff) was G. W. Coonrod, who was elected in 1864, and served two years most efficiently. GEO. W. COONROD, of Greenfield, Ill., an old settler, and one of the prominent men of Greene county, was born in Wayne county, Illinois, September 3, 1827. He is the son of Stephen and Candis (Lee) Coonrod, both natives of Kentucky, his father being born in 1798, and his mother in 1800. His father was a Baptist preacher. In the year 1829 he moved his family from Wayne county to Greene county, where he made his first entry of land, on the northeast quarter of the northwest quarter of Sec. 33, T. 11, R. 10, on which he built his first cabin, afterward entering the 40 acre tracts, adjoining the first entry, north and south, and purchasing the 40 acres adjoining east, where he built a more commodious house, and moved into it, in the year 1835, where he died in 1872 of that dreadful disease - small pox, his wife surviving him, dying at her son Jefferson Coonrod's in Greenfield, in the fall of 1879. George W. was the fourth child in the family of 11 children. He received his education in the common schools of that early day, becoming proficient enough in the branches then taught to teach, himself, and followed the profession of common school teacher, interspersed with teaching classes in penmanship in Greene and the adjoining counties, from 1847 to 1852, when he went to Texas and followed the same calling until 1855, when he came back to Illinois and engaged in the fall of that year in the mercantile business, in company with G. N. Kinkead under the firm name of Kinkead & Coonrod, at Greenfield. In 1858 having been appointed postmaster, he retired from the firm and connected with the post office a confectionary, notion and grocery business in company with a younger brother. In 1861 he resigned the postmastership, continuing the mercantile business. In February, 1858, he was married to Mary a. Parks, born Dec. 28, 1837, in Meredosia, Morgan county, Ill. By this union they had five children, four of whom are living - Arthur G., born Jan. 6, 1859, at Greenfield; Louis P., born Oct. 5, 1860; Catharine E., born April 17, 1863, died Oct. 8, 1864; Mary E., born at Carrollton, July 12, 1865, and Helen G., also born there, Dec. 14, 1868. Mrs. Coonrod died at Greenfield, Ill., June 2, 1870. Mr. Coonrod was again married Dec. 25, 1871, to Mattie E. Nutting, a native of Portland, Me., born March 3, 1847. By this union there were four children, three of whom are living - Edith J., born Jan. 3, 1873, died Nov. 22, 1873; Curtis M., born June 24, 1875; William J., born Aug. 5, 1877; Guy N., born Feb. 14, 1879. Mr. Coonrod in 1864 was elected sheriff of Greene county on the democratic ticket, and in November of that year moved to Carrollton. After his term of office expired he engaged in the family grocery business at that place, closing out the same in the spring of 1875, and moving back to Greenfield he engaged in the same business in partnership with J. W. Piper, under the firm name of Coonrod & Piper. In 1876 he retired from mercantile business. He had held several positions of trust in the city, having served many years on the board of education; was twice elected president of the town council; in 1877 was elected police magistrate, and served four years. In 1883 he was appointed, by the governor, a notary public, which office, with insurance and general agency business now occupies his time, together with seeing after his farming interests in Greene county, Illinois, and Bates county, Missouri. He was elected in 1884, the attorney for the city of Greenfield on its adopting a city government and compiled the code of ordinances governing that young city. Was one of the commissioners to divide the county into political townships after the adoption of township organization. In politics he has usually acted with the democrats, but votes independently for the man he conceives to be the best qualified for the office. He belongs to no church, believing more in practical christianity than creeds and dogmas of sects. Independent in thought and action, regardless of popularity, preferring always to be right as his best judgment dictates. He belongs to no secret organization, and by strict attention to business has made life a success financially."

1850 Greene Co, IL. According to the census, he was still living with his parents and was
a school teacher.

1852 TX. While there he also taught school.

1855 Greenfield, Greene Co, IL. He returned home and "engaged in the fall of that year in the mercantile business, in company with G. N. Kinkead under the firm name of Kinkead & Coonrod.

1858 He was appointed postmaster and so "retired from the firm and connected with the post office a confectionery, notion and grocery business in company with a younger brother."

1861 "He resigned the postmastership, continuing in the mercantile business."

1864 He was elected to the office of sheriff "on the democratic ticket" and "served two years most efficiently."

Nov 1865 Carrollton, Greene Co, IL. After serving his term of sheriff, he "engaged in the family grocery business at that place, closing out the same in the spring of 1875.

1870 Greenfield, Greene Co, IL. The census that year said he was a 42 year old grocer with property worth $1000/4000. His household included: Arthur, 11; Louis, 9; Emma, 4; and Helen, 1; besides Margaret Parks, 62 year old housekeeper, and Lavina Crawford, domestic servant.

Spring 1875 Greenfield. Again returning home, he "engaged in the same (grocery/mercantile) business in partnership with J W Piper, under the firm name of Coonrod & Piper.

1876 He retired from the store. "he had held several positions of trust in the city, having served many years on the board of education; was twice elected president of the town council.

1877 He was elected police magistrate for a 4 year term.

6/19/1880 Greenfield, Greene Co, IL. In that census George was 52 and a Justice of the Peace. Second wife, Mattie was 33 and they had children: Arthur G, 21; Louis P, 19; Emma, 14; Helen G, 11; Curtis, 4; and William J, 2 and Guy N, 1. Mattie's mother, Eliza Nutting, 75, was also there.

1883 The governor appointed him a notary public "which office, with insurance and general agency business now occupies his time, together with seeing after his farming interests...."

The same local 1885 history said he was an old settler and one of the prominent men of the county.
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